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Fascinating History of Ciragan Palace

-Attractions June 26, 2016
1,609 views
ciragan palace

ciragan palace

Ciragan Palace is one of the most greatest structure of Istanbul city. It comes from Ottoman Empire. Nowaday, the place is used as a hotel. Actually, it is very famous hotel around of the world. The palace is located in Besiktas district.  What do you know about Ciragan Palace? We’ll share everything about Ciragan Palace with you.

You can find cafe and restaurants in the vicinity of Ciragan Palace. Actually, the street, whic has the place is most cosmopolitan street of Besiktas district. So, not to hard find a restaurant or cafe. And, If you come to Istanbul city, definitely you should see bosphorus view of Ciragan Palace. This is why it is very famous hotel around of the world. Nowadays, the palace use for wedding ceremony. Its price is too expensive maybe, but for a great wedding ceremony totally worth it. What can you say for an afternoon tea in the palace? Drink a cupple of tea opposite the Bosphorus view, maybe one of the fascinating things of the world.

bosphorus view from ciragan palace

The hotel is too expensive maybe, especially you want to rent a wedding ceremony. But If you want to have a breakfast. So many people wondering breakfast price of Ciragan Palace. But it is changing according to season and year. You have to call and ask them for price.

Ciragan Palace Address

Çırağan Cd. No:32, 34349 Beşiktaş/İstanbul

Contact: for contact to the Palace you can use this link. (click here)

ciragan palace wedding

a wedding ceremony from the Ciragan Palace

Çırağan Palace, Marble columned timber water side mansions that were here before the Palace and made by Mahmut were demolished by Abdülmecit in 1857; but Project was postponed due to financial matters. After the death of Abdülmecit his brother Abdülaziz took his place and made Sarkis and Agop Balyan built the Çırağan Palace in between Beşiktaş and Ortaköy in between 1863-1871. Unfortunately only the body walls of the magnificent building that was endowed with valuable goods produced specially for the palace remained after the fire in January 1910. The other adjacent buildings of the palace that were spread through Beşiktaş and Ortaköy, were assigned to schools in the Republic Period and are serving for this purpose now. The main palace building which waited as a ruin for long years, was rented to a foreign investor with a contract signed in 1986. A new hotel building was constructed in its garden; the interior of the burned palace was renewed and used as the ballroom, ceremony saloons and restaurantsof the hotel.

Ciragan Palace History and Architecture

The area where Ciragan Palace now stands was known as Kazancioğlu Gardens in 17th century. In the second half of the 16th century, commander of the navy Kilic ALi Pasha has a waterfront residence here, and in 1648 Sultan Murad IV gave the imperial garden to his daughter Kaya Sultan and her husband Grand Vizier Melek Ahmed Pasha. They had a small wooden mansion built here, where they would spend the summer months. At the begining of the 18th century, AHmed III presented the house and grounds to his son-in low Grand Vizier Ibrahim Pasha of Nevsehir; here he organized torchlight fetes, known as Ciragan Festivals with his wife, Fatma Sultan. This was when the area became known as Ciragan.

The most beautiful location on the Bosphorus were dedicated to the pavilions and mansions of the sultans and high-ranking officials. Over time most of these have disappeared. Çırağan, which used to be a grand place, burned down in 1910. The Çırağan Palace, built on the same location as the previous wooden palace, was constructed in 1871 by the royal architect Serkis  Balyan on the orders of Sultan Abdulaziz. The four-year-long construction cost 4 million akçe. The rich decoration was completed with columns that displayed superior craftmanship in stonework. The rooms were decorated with expensive carpets and furniture detailed in gold and mother-of pearl. Like the other Bosphorus palaces, Çırağan has been the site of mny important meetings.

The exterior of the palace was faced with marble and there were monumental gates; an overpass linked this palace to the grounds of Yildiz Palace, which was high on the ridge. The side facing the puplic road was surrounded by high walls.

Lady Mary Wortly Montagu, the wife of the English ambassador. Edward Wortley Montagu, live in the Istanbul between 1717 and 1718; in her latters she mentions the original Ciragan Palace: “It is situated on one of the most delightful parts of the  canal, with a fine wood on the side of a hill behind it. The extent of it is prodigious; the guardian assured me there were eight hundred rooms in it. I will not, however, answer for that number is very large, and the whole adorned with a profusion of marble, gilding and the most ex exquisite painting of fruit and flowers. The windows are all sashed with the finest crysalline glass brought from England, and here is all the expensive magnificence that you can suppose in a palace founded by a young man, with the wealth of a vast empire at his command.”

After the rebelion of 1730, which brought the great Tulip Era to and end, the palace was left empty and it fell into disrepair. It was finally taken over by Sultan Mahmud I to be used as a banquenting hall for foreign ambassadors. The grand vicier of Selim III, Yusuf Ziya Pasha, bought the palace, knocked it down, and commissioned Kirkor Balyan to build a new palece in marble, which he presented to the sultan in 1805. Selim III then presented the palace to his sister, Beyhan Sultan, but she turned it down.

This palace was used as a summer house during the reign of Mahmud II; it was then again demolished and rebuilt on a larger scale by Garabed Balyan from 1835 to 1843. Although great quantites of wood were used, the main section was made from marble and stone, and there were forty classical columns.

When Sultan Abdülmecid decided to move the offical residence to Dolmabahçe Palace in 1885, Çırağan Palace was again torn down, to be replaced by an imposing stone edifice designed by Nikogos Balyan, and foundations  of the present palace were laid. However, due to financial problems and the “Kuleli Event,” a conspiracy to assasinate the sultan, the construction of the palace was left half finished. It was only completed in 1874, after Sultan Abdulaziz succeeded to the throne. Sultan Abdülaziz demanted that this palace be built in the Arab style as a memorial to his reign. Artists were sent to Spain and North Afirca to make drawings of famous buildings there. It is said that the sultan interfered with the design so much that the plans were redawn twenty times before he was satisfied. The palace doors, each worth one thousand gold akçe, were so admired by Kaiser Wilhelm that some were presented to him as a gift; these can be found in the Berlin Museum today. The finest marble and mother-of-pearl were brought from all over the world for the new Çırağan Palace; construction was completed at a total cost of five million Ottoman gold liras. But Sultan Abdulaziz only lived here for a few months before pronouncing it too damp to live in.

When Sultan Abdulhamid acceded to the throne in 1876, Sultan Murad V whose mental health was impaired was held prisoner here, with his family until his death in 1905. After this, the palace became the new location for parliament convened here for just two months before a fire broke out in the central heating vents and destroyed the entire palace in just under five hours, leaving only a stone shell. Priceless antiques, paintings and books were lost, along with many vital documents.

In 1946, Parlaiment gave the palace, its outbuildings and grounds, to the Istanbul Municipality; it was used as a dumping ground for sand and other construction materials. It was used as a dumping ground for sand and other construction materials. It was also used as a swimming pool and a football ground for the local team. It seemed only a matter of time before the last remnants of the former palace would be torn down once and for all. However, the palace has now been restored and is a luxurious hotel.

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